by Anthony Crockett
for the NW region day conference, Nov 2006

Some of you will know that at the beginning of the year, I was embroiled in an argument on the Fulcrum website with the Revd Dr Andrew Goddard of Wycliffe Hall, about the current debate regarding the rights of homosexual people.

This was in the light of two statements of the Bench of Bishops of the Church in Wales on the subject. I was delighted when, as part of his contribution to the conversation, Dr Goddard published on the website his very erudite article Semper Reformanda in a Changing World: Calvin, Usury and Evangelical Moral Theology.

by Chris Rayner
for the NW region day conference, Nov 2006

When I chose this topic for today's conference we had not been subjected to the controversial debate about the wearing of veils, crosses and other religious indications of faith.

Also, the hype regarding 'The Da Vinci Code' was only just beginning. All this has been left out of the talk and I shall be focusing on symbolism (and metaphor) in the Christian faith, how people outside the Church see Christianity through them, and I hope to initiate a discussion on whether there is a need for change. I have found it very difficult to distinguish between symbolism and metaphor and so shall speak on 'Christian symbol and metaphor: do they need changing?'

by Watson Fuller
for the NW region day conference, Nov 2006

The aim of this talk is to prompt discussion on how we can free ourselves from Christian doctrine that has become an obstacle to belief while still celebrating our rich heritage of Christian faith and practice.

Consequences of historic evangelism

The claim "Christianity is for everyone" has echoed down the centuries, finding expression in the belief that the Christian revelation can illuminate lives - individually and collectively - in every human situation. Some of the greatest achievements during the last two millennia bear testament to the validity of this belief. However any belief system operating on so broad a canvas is inevitably interpreted and applied differently in different times and places with not all outcomes being so welcome and with some strange and often unattractive bedfellows answering the call.

by Jonathan Clatworthy
for the NW region day conference, Nov 2006

The Anglican Communion is being polarized into two camps, liberals and conservatives. The presenting issues are gay bishops and women bishops, but what makes them irresolvable is that the two camps speak different languages.

I shall describe the development of these traditions, and draw out some inferences for today.

at Gladstone's Library, Hawarden

October 2011: The Resurrection

Led by Professor Paul Badham, Emeritus Professor of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Wales.

Report by Dick Martin.

October 2010: The Gospel Infancy Narratives

Led by Dr Gareth Lloyd Jones, Emeritus Professor in the School of Theology, Bangor University

Report by Richard Martin.

June 2010: Liberal Faith and Positive Values

Led by MCU General Secretary Jonathan Clatworthy

Report by Liz Poynton.

November 2009: Assisted Dying

Led by the Very Revd Professor Gordon McPhate, Dean of Chester and former pathologist, and Dr Oenone Wollaston, a Christian GP with special interest in geriatrics and end-of-life issues.

Report by David Taylor.

June 2009: Faith in a Darwinian World

Led by Dr Stephen Lewis, Department of Biology, University of Chester.

Sessions
  • Christian Responses to Science - too Apologetic or too Radical?
  • The Bible - 'Word of God' or 'Word of Warning'?
  • Are we 'Fallen Angels' or 'Risen Apes' (and is there any Substantive Difference?)
  • Is Science a Bigger Problem for Religion than Religion is for Science?
  • Finding Security in Uncertainty
Report by David Taylor.

November 2008

Sessions
  • Peter Law-Jones: The Case of Harold Davidson, the 'Notorious Rector of Stiffkey'
  • Richard Martin: Darwin - Five reasons for Unease
  • David Owen: Exploring God
  • Paul Smith: Theological Reflections during a Year in Afghanistan
  • David Taylor: The Elephant in the Room

June 2008: A Woman's Place...

An exploration into the roles of women and men in society and the church.

Report by Richard Martin.

November 2007

A DIY meeting with short talks by group members followed by discussion.

Sessions

November 2006

Seven group members were each asked to give a ten-minute talk to be followed by time for discussion.

Reflections by Barbara Wollaston.

Sessions

June 2006: Gone for Good? An exploration of church leaving

With Professor Leslie J Francis from the University of Wales, Lampeter. A Saturday based around  Professor Francis' detailed analysis of the views and behaviour of people who left the church  and then returned.

Report by Karin Lyle.